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Hachette Children’s

Every Child A Song by Nicola Davies & Marc Martin

Written for the thirtieth anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), this beautiful book celebrates the worth of every child.

Using the metaphor of song, the story shows us how every child is unique and brings something new and wonderful to the world.

At the start of the book we see a newborn baby bring a new song in to existence. That song is nurtured with love, shelter, protection and a sense of belonging. Afforded these basic rights, the song soars and explores. On its journey it finds new songs – some loud and some quiet, and some long and some short – but each wonderful in its own way.

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Amazing Daddy by Rachel Bright

The little panda in this story thinks her Daddy is simply amazing! He makes her yummy food, he loves to snuggle and he smells like ‘safe and warm’.

The gorgeous rhyme follows the pair as they go through their day. To an observer, nothing they do is extraordinary – they eat, they play, they have a bath – but to the baby panda every little moment is special because she gets to spend it with her Daddy.

We love this one because of the gorgeous illustrations and the cheeky humour. There are lots of fun details hidden in the pictures – keep an eye out for Daddy’s aftershave –  ‘Old Panda Spice’ – and the very important pieces of paper on the table in Daddy Panda’s office!

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There’s A Lion In The Library by Dave Skinner & Aurélie Guillerey

With her little dimples and tiny button nose, Lucy Lupin looks utterly adorable. However if you take a peek below the surface, Lucy isn’t quite what she seems. She’s actually pretty mean and she loves to tell big juicy lies!

One Monday morning she goes to the library and tells the biggest lie she can think of. She walks right up to the Librarian and tells her there’s a lion in the history section, eating a book about the Ancient Egyptians. The Librarian takes one look at cute little Lucy and presumes she must be telling the truth. The library is evacuated and the police are called but there’s no sign of a lion anywhere. Everyone is perplexed, except little Lucy who finds the whole thing hilarious.

In fact, she enjoys the lie so much that she goes back and repeats it again and again. On Tuesday she informs the Caretaker that there’s a lion in the romance section, and on Wednesday she tells the Coffee Shop Manager there’s a lion in the geography section. Soon the adults at the library cotton on to the fact that adorable little Lucy isn’t actually adorable at all.

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Avocado Asks: What Am I? by Momoko Abe

Avocado AsksAvocado lives on the fruit and vegetable aisle at the supermarket. Life is nice and simple until one day the nature of his whole existence is thrown in to question by a small child. She points at him and asks her mum whether an avocado is a fruit or a vegetable.

Suddenly Avocado is thrown in to confusion. He doesnt know the answer. How can he not know who he really is? Determined to dscover his true identity, Avocado turns to his friends for help.

First stop is the vegetables, who decide he can’t possibly be one of them because he’s not leafy or crunchy and he has a big stone in his middle like a fruit. So next he visits the fruit, but they say he’s not one of them either. He’s not sweet or juicy and he wouldn’t taste right in a fruit salad.

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The Memory Tree
by Britta Teckentrup

This beautiful book from Britta Teckentrup helps children process grief after a bereavement.

When Fox lays down in his favourite forest clearing and takes his last breath, the other animals are bereft. He was such a huge part of each of their lives and they are not sure how they will be able to move forward without him. As snow falls on Fox and covers his body, his friends gather in a circle and sit with him in silence.

After a long while, Owl speaks. He shares a story from his youth about chasing autumn leaves with Fox. Mouse goes next, remembering how much Fox liked to sit and watch the sunset. One by one each of the forest animals raises their voice to speak out about the treasured memories they have of their wonderful friend.

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Pug Hug by Zehra Hicks

The pug in this book really wants a hug. He asks all of his animal friends but no one seems interested. Hamster is busy spinning on his wheel, Rabbit is eating carrots, Cat just doesn’t like hugs, the parrots laugh at him and Fish… well, hugging Fish would be a little tricky.

Feeling dejected, Pug curls up and snuggles himself. His ears prick up when a crocodile offers him a cuddle but he soon realises the croc has ulterior motives! Will Pug ever get the big hug he desires?

This book has been a big hit with us! The vibrant illustrations jump right off the page and Ivy has fallen in love with the adorable Pug character.

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Chatterbox Bear
by Pippa Curnick

Gary the bear loves to chat. He chats at the supermarket, he chats in the library and he even chats in the bath! The trouble is, he’s giving all the other bears a headache with his incessant ‘Raar-ing’.

The chatterbox bear decides to set off on an adventure to find some animals who like to talk as much as he does. He sets sail on a boat and eventually he finds himself on an island surrounded by chatty birds. However they all speak Bird and can’t understand Bear.

They try to make sense of all Gary’s ‘Raars’ but they are baffled by the noises he makes. Why can’t he just Squawk like they do?

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My Monster And Me by Nadiya Hussain & Ella Bailey

Anxiety is one of the most common mental health conditions experienced by children but it can be a difficult topic to discuss with someone who is too young to put their feelings in to words. This book uses the metaphor of a monster, albeit a friendly yellow one, to help kids understand.

At the start of the story a young boy introduces his monster and explains that it has been around for as long as he can remember. It’s large, loud and bossy, and it often gets in his way when he’s trying to enjoy himself. When his parents are around the monster hides so he doesn’t feel like he can talk to them about it, but he really wishes it would go away.

One day it all becomes too much and he opens his heart to his grandmother. In tears, he tells her all about the intolerable monster and how it just won’t leave him alone – but as he talks, something special happens. The monster starts to shrink! As the words tumble from his mouth the monster gets smaller and smaller until eventually he can pick it up and pop it in his pocket. Although he knows the monster will always be there, the little boy now knows that he is in control rather than the other way around.

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The Worrysaurus
by Rachel Bright & Chris Chatterton

If you’ve been following Ivy’s Library for a while you’ll know I’m really passionate about books which help small children to understand and verbalise their feelings. I’m also a huge fan of author Rachel Bright, so when The Worrysaurus landed on our doorstep I was really excited. Ivy was instantly entranced by the title character – an adorable little red dinosaur with a tiny green backpack – and demanded we read it right away!

The Worrysaurus is a planner and a worrier (to be honest, he’s a lot like me!). When he decides to go on a picnic he organises it all in his advance. He plans out a route, he packs all of the things he might need in to his trusty bag and then he heads out in to the sunshine.

However it’s not long before his brain starts to itch. What if he didn’t pack enough to drink? What if he gets lost on the way? Slowly his happy mood starts to slip away and anxiety creeps in. When a little lizard warns him that there might be a storm poor Worrysaurus starts to panic. He’s not prepared for rain!

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The Invisible String
by Patrice Karst & Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

This wonderful picture book teaches children about the unbreakable bond we have with the people closest to us, whether they are near or far.

When Liza and Jeremy are awoken by thunder they run straight to their mother for comfort. She tries to encourage them back to their own beds but it’s clear that they don’t want to leave – so she tells them about the Invisible String. At first the children are confused. What string? Why can’t they see it? Where does it go?

Their mother explains that the Invisible String is made out of love and it connects you to your favourite people, even when you can’t see them. Whenever you miss someone, your love flows through the string and tugs on their heart so they know you are thinking of them. Their love then travels right back to you.

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